lucius_t (lucius_t) wrote in theinferior4,
lucius_t
lucius_t
theinferior4

Furious Vroom Death

 Occasionally I annoy people, sometimes I do so on purpose, just to see how they'll react, and occasionally they react in colorful ways.  Of all the ways people have reacted to me, I think this (from a MMA forum) is my favorite.

"listen hear bud, you liked to want trouble, i will sabotage your mind and face with punched and kicked, you make not tough in life only with tough words, if i find i kill you fast and furious vroom death"

I shudder to think what furious vroom death may be, but must admit Im kind of curious.  Compared to the readership of this blog, MMA forums are a cross between a monkey house and an idiot farm, but even in those base precincts you can find something approaching poetry.  I may use furious vroom death as a title, if only I can up with something worthy...

Here's an uncensored" trailer for District 9 you may not have seen and is slightly different from that previously seen.


The original preview made it look like Alien Nation, but this and the synopsis -- a government agent is exposed to the biotechnology of this alien race -- have me intrigued.  Then there's the short film on which the movie is based:


Maybe it's good.  We'll find out in August.

I'm reading a novel by John Griesemer, Signal and Noise, about the laying of a transatlantic telephone cable during the mid-Victorian period.  Check out part of the PW review (read the rest on Amazon):

Griesemer's vast historical novel, his follow-up to No One Thinks of Greenland, follows the attempts of engineers to lay a transatlantic telegraph cable in the 1850s and '60s. Chester Ludlow is the chief American engineer on the cable project. An investor in the cable syndicate persuades him to raise more money for the venture by doing a lecture tour; the main attraction of the tour is a new kind of mechanical diorama, the Phantasmagoria, that enacts the story of the transatlantic cable project for patrons as Chester narrates it and musician Katerina Lindt, the wife of the diorama's creator, Joachim, provides the accompaniment. While on tour, Chester's charisma so arouses Katerina that she stows away on his ship when he embarks on the next cable-laying expedition; the two become lovers, and Katerina leaves Joachim. Meanwhile, at the Ludlow family's house in Maine, Chester's brother, Otis, an engineer and mystic, is teaching Chester's wife, Franny, how to communicate with the dead. Franny is a former actress mourning the death of her four-year-old daughter; with Otis's help she becomes a renowned spiritualist. As Chester attempts to communicate across the ocean, Otis and Fanny are wiring up to the infinite. The story clips along through the exciting process of laying the actual cable, immerses us in the horrors of the American Civil War (during which Chester is recruited for war work) and climaxes with Chester's final expedition in 1865, when he must work with Katerina's ex-husband. Though Otis, who becomes pivotal in the novel, is somewhat underdeveloped, this is an accomplished, gripping work.Griesemer's vast historical novel, his follow-up to No One Thinks of Greenland, follows the attempts of engineers to lay a transatlantic telegraph cable in the 1850s and '60s. Chester Ludlow is the chief American engineer on the cable project. An investor in the cable syndicate persuades him to raise more money for the venture by doing a lecture tour; the main attraction of the tour is a new kind of mechanical diorama, the Phantasmagoria, that enacts the story of the transatlantic cable project for patrons as Chester narrates it and musician Katerina Lindt, the wife of the diorama's creator, Joachim, provides the accompaniment....

I'm digging it a lot.

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